CMake/C Plugins for Loadable Commands

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Revision as of 20:14, 24 December 2008 by Kernigh (talk | contribs) (How to use CMake's load_command command, in this case to cause CMake to exit with status 42 (as a useless example!). I think that using load_command is generally a bad idea.)
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The normal way to add a new command to CMake is to just define a new macro or function (with the macro and endmacro or function and endfunction commands).

The other way is to use the load_command command, but how does this command work? Actually, this command allows you to code a new CMake command in C or C++, and dynamically load the command into a running CMake. It effectively allows you to insert your own C or C++ code into CMake. The C plugin interface is actually a good example of design of a plugin interface, but it is difficult to use, it has almost no documentation (before the creation of this wiki page), it has several quirks and limitations, it seems leftover from an ancient CMake version, though it remains present in CMake 2.6.

Avoid this feature! Coding a plugin and using load_command is probably not a good idea. This wiki page is for those readers who wonder about load_command or who want to experiment with it. Also, anyone can edit the page and add more information.

Overview

The cmLoadCommandCommand.cxx source file implements a load_command command, which takes the form of

load_command(SomeName dir1 dir2 ...)

This command prefixes "cm" to SomeName, and then loads a cmSomeName module into CMake. (For ELF systems, this would dlopen(3) a "libcmSomeName.so" file into CMake.) It searches for the module in the dir1, dir2, ... directories. Then it looks for and immediately calls the SomeNameInit function in the module.

One can code the module in C or C++, but it must include the cmCPluginAPI.h file, which defines the interface from the module to CMake. The SomeNameInit function must use this interface to define one and only one new CMake command.

EXIT example

How to make CMake exit with status 42?

Wrap the exit(3) C function as a CMake command. For example,

# in CMakeLists.txt
exit(42)

should immediately cause CMake to exit with the given status. This also skips the usual cleaning and error messages, so the exit command will never be useful in any actual CMake project. The exit command intends only a simple example of something that not any macro or function can do.

cmExitCommand.c

This is a C plugin. The entire source is in one file cmExitCommand.c which contains the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#include <cmCPluginAPI.h>

void ExitCommandInit(cmLoadedCommandInfo *);
static int ipass(void *, void *, int, char *[]);

void
ExitCommandInit(cmLoadedCommandInfo *info) {
        info->Name = "exit";
        info->InitialPass = ipass;
}

int
ipass(void *in, void *mf, int argc, char *argv[]) {
        cmLoadedCommandInfo *info;
        int status;

        info = (cmLoadedCommandInfo *) in;

        if (argc != 1) {
                info->Error =
                    strdup("called with incorrect number of arguments");
                return 0;
        }

        if (sscanf(argv[0], "%d%*c", &status) != 1) {
                info->Error =
                    strdup("requires an integer argument");
                return 0;
        }

        exit(status);
        /* NOTREACHED */
        return 1;
}

That was the entire source code for the exit command. This module does not make any API calls back to CMake (no use of info->CAPI in the code), but it already demonstrates how to cause a command to do something, and how to report errors.

ExitCommandInit

CMake calls the ExitCommandInit function immediately after loading the module. The rule is that a module called cmSomeName needs a SomeNameInit function; so a cmExitCommand module needs an ExitCommandInit function. This function must take a pointer to a struct. Here again is the code to ExitCommandInit:

void
ExitCommandInit(cmLoadedCommandInfo *info) {
        info->Name = "exit";
        info->InitialPass = ipass;
}

How to write the ExitCommandInit function? CMake initializes all info fields to zero (except info->CAPI), so this function needs only to set the interesting fields. The most important field is info->Name to the name of the command.

Every command has an InitialPass and a FinalPass. Most commands need only the InitialPass, a function that takes four arguments (void *info, void *mf, int argc, char *argv[]).

InitialPass

The declaration for InitialPass uses void *info instead of cmLoadedCommandInfo *info. The code uses a cast to avoid a warning in some compilers.

        info = (cmLoadedCommandInfo *) in;

InitialPass returns an int value, to be nonzero if the command succeeds, or zero if it fails.

The correct way to report an error is to set the info->Error string. For some strange reason, CMake will try to free(3) the string later. If you simply assign a string, then CMake will later pass a bogus pointer to free(3). Instead you need to malloc(3) the string somehow; this is the reason for the strdup(3) calls. After you set the error string, you can return 0 to make the command fail.

Also, CMake prepends the name of the command to the error message, so "called with incorrect number of arguments" becomes "exit called with incorrect number of arguments".

The "exit" command needs two error checks; one to check the number of arguments, and another to check that the argument is an integer. (Though builtin CMake commands use atoi(3) without an error check.)

        if (argc != 1) {
                info->Error =
                    strdup("called with incorrect number of arguments");
                return 0;
        }

        if (sscanf(argv[0], "%d%*c", &status) != 1) {
                info->Error =
                    strdup("requires an integer argument");
                return 0;
        }

Compiling a module

The cmExitCommand.c file leaves a problem. CMake cannot load a C source file directly, CMake can only load a compiled module.

The output of cmake --help-command load_command suggests using try_compile to compile the module, but try_compile only compiles executables (because it uses add_executable). So you need to create a separate CMake project for the cmExitCommand module, and build this project before loading the cmExitCommand module into any other project.

(It might be possible to trick try_compile to build a module, or at least build an executable that exports its symbols like a module, if you pass the correct compiler flags after the COMPILE_DEFINITIONS keyword. However this would require to discover the correct compiler flags.)

Also, the compiler needs to find the cmCPluginAPI.h header file. CMake installs a copy in ${CMAKE_ROOT}/include.

The following CMakeLists.txt file is enough to corectly build the cmExitCommand module:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.6)
project(ExitCommand C)
include_directories(${CMAKE_ROOT}/include)
add_library(cmExitCommand MODULE cmExitCommand.c)

The name of the cmExitCommand.c file is not important; but the name of the cmExitCommand target needs to match with the name of the ExitCommandInit function.

Put this CMakeLists.txt and cmExitCommand.c in one directory. Configure and build this project, then you have a module to try to load in CMake.

Testing the module

With the compiled module, one can try to load it in a CMake project with load_command and use the new command. Because load_command is not scriptable, you cannot use a cmake -P script to test a module. You must create a test CMake project.

The following CMakeLists.txt file is such a project:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.6)
project(exam C)
# replace ../work with path to module
load_command(ExitCommand ../work)
exit(freeway)
exit(19 left)
exit(42)

When this script runs, the load_command succeeds. The first two exit commands cause errors. The third such command exits CMake (and skips the usual error message about failing to configure the project). Unix users can use the command echo $? to check the exit status from CMake:

unix$ cmake .
-- The C compiler identification is GNU
-- Check for working C compiler: /usr/bin/gcc
-- Check for working C compiler: /usr/bin/gcc -- works
-- Detecting C compiler ABI info
-- Detecting C compiler ABI info - done
CMake Error at CMakeLists.txt:4 (exit):
  exit requires an integer argument


CMake Error at CMakeLists.txt:5 (exit):
  exit called with incorrect number of arguments


unix$ echo $?
42
unix$

That was the story of how, after coding a C plugin, compiling a module and loading the module into CMake, we caused CMake to exit with status 42.

Another Example?

Anyone can edit this wiki page and add more information. The person who wanted to bother could post or link an example of a plugin that actually used info->CAPI for something.